Wednesday, July 13, 2016

The Sociology Book by DK Publishing, Sam Atkinson

Summary
The Sociology Book takes on some of humankind's biggest questions: What is society? What makes it tick? Why do we interact in the way that we do with our friends, coworkers, and rivals? The Sociology Book profiles the world's most renowned sociologists and more than 100 of their biggest ideas, including issues of equality, diversity, identity, and human rights; the effects of globalization; the role of institutions; and the rise of urban living in modern society

Easy to navigate and chock-full of key concepts, profiles of major sociological thinkers, and conversation starters galore, this is a must-have, in-a-nutshell guide to some of the most fascinating questions on earth.

The Sociology Book is part of the award-winning Big Ideas Simply Explained series, designed to distill big ideas and elusive theories into graspable, memorable concepts, using an approachable graphic treatment and creative typography. 

Impressions
Perfect for people who want to learn more about sociology!

I was curious about what I will find: a lot of interesting concepts and ideas clearly explained. Food for thoughts about the foundation of sociology, cultural identity and the family dynamics. It's an interesting read if you are at school or just curious about sociology.

A cool one!

Source
*Arc provided by Edelweiss
I received this book in exchange of a fair and honest review.

Sunday, July 10, 2016

The Adjustments by Ann Lineberger

Summary
In the postcard Connecticut town of Cannondale, financial status is followed closely by social standing. Nowhere is this battle more fiercely contested than among the housewives of Fairfield County.

Attending yoga classes at the trendy studio in town—taught by the sexy and mysterious Yogi Jack—is part of every elite woman’s routine. It allows them a daily escape from the madness of their over-scheduled lives. But the inner peace that yoga brings is only part of the appeal: many of the women come for Yogi Jack, the studio’s sexual energy, and the seductive in-class adjustments.

In his private sessions, Yogi Jack provides services above and beyond the usual realm of warrior pose, downward-facing dog, and shavasana. One-on-one time with Jack is increasingly sought-after by every one of his female students, from women looking for a deeper stretch to those seeking an entirely different kind of experience—a sexual awakening.

As high-profile magazine editor Elizabeth Kelly and her realtor sister Abigail Davis-Powers soon discover, their little affluent town is not at all what it seems. Hidden behind the immaculately designed houses and their posh façades is the dirty laundry of the housewives of Fairfield County.

Drama, jealousy, and intrigue emerge as the women delve deeper into the greedy, status-obsessed underbelly of Cannondale. And when one dark secret finds the light of day, it will threaten to change their lives forever.



Impressions
I was expected to be entertained...

A horny version of "Desperate housewives" in a yoga studio.
Perfect if you like yoga but soon it becomes more about how the teacher will take care of his students sexual fantaisies.
Not really attractive or seductive, kind of pathetic, as the main character try to take advantage of the wife unhappiness.
Not really a read to escape after a long day but not a bad one either.

Source
*Arc provided by Netgalley
I received this book in exchange of a fair and honest review.

Saturday, July 9, 2016

We Could Be Beautiful by Swan Huntley



Summary

Catherine West has spent her entire life surrounded by beautiful things. She owns an immaculate Manhattan apartment, she collects fine art, she buys exquisite handbags and clothing, and she constantly redecorates her home. And yet, despite all this, she still feels empty. She sees her personal trainer, she gets weekly massages, and occasionally she visits her mother and sister on the Upper East Side, but after two broken engagements and boyfriends who wanted only her money, she is haunted by the fear that she’ll never have a family of her own.

One night, at an art opening, Catherine meets William Stockton, a handsome man who shares her impeccable taste and love of beauty. He is educated, elegant, and even has a personal connection—his parents and Catherine’s parents were friends years ago. But as he and Catherine grow closer, she begins to encounter strange signs, and her mother, Elizabeth (now suffering from Alzheimer’s), seems to have only bad memories of William as a boy. In Elizabeth’s old diary she finds an unnerving letter from a former nanny that cryptically reads: “We cannot trust anyone…” Is William lying about his past?
And if so, is Catherine willing to sacrifice their beautiful life in order to find the truth? Featuring a fascinating heroine who longs for answers but is blinded by her own privilege, We Could Be Beautiful is a glittering, seductive, utterly surprising story of love, money, greed, and family.


Impressions
Hmm... I'm perplex!

The cover has piqued my curiosity as well as the synopsis. I was expected to be intrigued. Instead, I've been pissed off by Catherine.

Hard to relate to a character who has everything and can only worried about finding love. If the story is fluid and well-written, I admit I've found some length and got even bored before evrything in Catherine's life start to fall appart.

Since, I'm impatient with my books lately, I will let you make you own decisions...


Source
*Arc provided by Edelweiss
I received this book in exchange of a fair and honest review.

Thursday, July 7, 2016

A Season for Fireflies by Rebecca Maizel

Summary
A story of second chances from the author of Between Us and the Moon, which Kirkus Reviews called “what first love is meant to be.”

A year ago, Penny Berne was the star of her high school’s theater department, surrounded by a group of misfit friends and falling in love for the first time. Now her old friends won’t talk to her, her new best friend is the most popular girl in school, and her first love, Wes, ignores her. Penny is revered and hated. Then, in a flash, a near-fatal lightning strike leaves Penny with no memory of the past year—or how she went from drama nerd to queen bee. 

As a record number of fireflies light up her town and her life, Penny realizes she may be able to make things right again—and that even if she can’t change the past, she can learn to see the magic where she never could before.

This captivating new novel about first love, second chances, and the power of memory is perfect for fans of Lauren Oliver’s Before I Fall and Katie Cotugno’s How to Love. 



Impressions
I was in the mood for something cute and since the synopsis was intriguing, I thought: Why not?
It was not my cup of tea even if the story was well written and enjoyable.

Sure, talking about living wth alcoolic parents was a great and interesting addition but I was not touched by the characters or embarked into the author's world. Something was missing.

But since I've read a lot of good critics, maybe it was just for me.

Source
*Arc provided by Edelweiss
I received this book in exchange of a fair and honest review.

Monday, July 4, 2016

The Battle for Home by Marwa al-Sabouni, Roger Scruton

Summary
Drawing on the author’s personal experience of living and working as an architect in Syria, this timely and fascinating account offers an eyewitness perspective on the country’s bitter conflict through the lens of architecture, showing how the built environment and its destruction hold up a mirror to the communities that inhabit it.

Impressions
The author is an architect who express her views on her country, the war, the reconstruction of Syria in a very beautiful way.

Through our sketches and drawings, you can witness how she sees the damages done to cities and her optimism. It's a touching, interesting book.

Was impressed by the honesty of her work.
Great book.

About the authors
Marwa al-Sabouni has a PhD in Islamic architecture and runs a private architectural studio in Homs, Syria. She has written for Architectural Review, and Wall Street International. She is co-owner of the first and only online media site dedicated to architectural news in Arabic, Arch News.

Roger Scruton is a writer and philosopher. His books include The Dictionary of Political Thought, A Land Held Hostage: Lebanon and the West, and The Aesthetics of Architecture.

Source
*Arc provided by Edelweiss
I received this book in exchange of a fair and honest review.

Sunday, July 3, 2016

Magic Bitter, Magic Sweet by Charlie N. Holmberg

Summary
Maire is a baker with an extraordinary gift: she can infuse her treats with emotions and abilities, which are then passed on to those who eat them. She doesn’t know why she can do this and remembers nothing of who she is or where she came from.

When marauders raid her town, Maire is captured and sold to the eccentric Allemas, who enslaves her and demands that she produce sinister confections, including a witch’s gingerbread cottage, a living cookie boy, and size-altering cakes.

During her captivity, Maire is visited by Fyel, a ghostly being who is reluctant to reveal his connection to her. The more often they meet, the more her memories return, and she begins to piece together who and what she really is—as well as past mistakes that yield cosmic consequences.

From the author of The Paper Magician series comes a haunting and otherworldly tale of folly and consequence, forgiveness and redemption.

Impressions
The Paper Magician series is great one. I've enjoyed myself with the first two books. So, I was thrilled to enter into this author world again.

Eager to following Maire adventures, her magical abilities with her cooking were promising. There is action, blood, magical references that are cool and well distilled along the story.
Unfortunately, I was dissapointed.

The author has teased me, piqued my curiousity but also made me wait for too long before giving me some answers. So my impatience has grown, when the scenes were repeating.

Too bad because there is a lot of potential and Maire is a great character.

 Lot of potential but too slow paced!

Source
*Arc provided by Netgalley
I received this book in exchange of a fair and honest review.

Saturday, July 2, 2016

Daoist Nei Gong for Women by Roni Edlund, Damo Mitchell, Sophie Johnson

Summary
Although the energetic anatomy of men and women is different, the ancient teachings of Nu Dan, a separate branch of internal alchemy for women, have been lost in the literature over the centuries and only survive through practice in the lineages.
This book takes a detailed look at female energetic anatomy, exploring how it is different from its male counterpart, and explains and describes the specific practices which support the unique strengths and challenges that the female energy system presents.
Previously wrapped in secrecy, the teachings in this book include qigong exercises that activate the energy of the uterus and an explanation of how menstruation and a connection to the cycles of the moon can be converted into a tool for Nei Gong development.


Impressions
Interesting but a bit long! But it was great to understand how women can practice differently.

When I've read the summary I was curious about the differences... Of course. At the same time, I was asking myself if it may be the same way with all the practice. Like for Tai Chi or even if we could apply it for medidation as we all are different.
So I was having a lot of questions and was excited to start this journey.

Don't get me wrong, it was a great one to hear about the authors experiences and the way they have discovered a new way of practicing for women. I just thought that it has taken to much time to explain it and to go right to the point.
Of course, you need to learn and understand the background but it has put an heaviness in something that already need some concentration.

Interesting but with length.

Source
*Arc provided by Netgalley
I received this book in exchange of a fair and honest review.

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